About The Project

Bullet Path

Gun - crime, conflict and assassination.

Thank you for visiting the Bullet Path website which was originally called Gunfire Graffiti UK. My name is Andrew Rigsby. This project started in 2008 as a very specific gun crime research study that investigates the illegal discharging of firearms and shotguns on the roadside. It is a common practise worldwide and surprisingly apparent in the UK.

Bullet Path still incorporates this gun crime aspect but now also focuses on a unique selection of gun slay murders, gun terror attacks and assassinations that have occurred around the world. This is covered in great detail in the BLOG section. I have researched events such as the assassination of JFK in 1963, the White House Farm murders in 1985, the murder of Jill Dando in 1999 and the Annecy shooting murders in France in 2012.

If you have an interest in this aspect of real crime you will discover that my overview of all the cases I have covered is different to what you have read about before.

With regard to the original Gunfire Graffiti studies there are interesting links. We know for example that Michael Ryan who committed the Hungerford Massacre in 1987 perpetrated these roadside type of shootings. He even admitted this to an employer before his rampage and Thames Valley Police found evidence close to Hungerford after his killing spree. Rather strangely a large amount of gunfire damage has appeared around the outskirts of Hungerford since 1987.

The American gangster and gunman Clyde Barrow, (Bonnie and Clyde), did the same in the 1930’s. Gunfire Graffiti, (which I refer to as firearm signatures), is an unchartered phenomenon. In the UK it is completely overlooked and not recorded by the authorities.

Roadside firearm and shotgun experimental sites in the UK and Northern Ireland found

Years investigating evidence of roadside gun crime

I am not a police officer, a detective or an official investigator but I am a trained observer, a diligent researcher and a published author. Having handled firearms for over 45 years, escaping from a random shooting incident in Spain in 1975 and completing a very active military career in the 1980’s  I hope I can be considered qualified to comment.

This 20mm shotgun slug penetration near the village of Twycross in Leicestershire was reported to the police in 2009. They advised the local media who became interested that it was probably, ‘Kids with catapults’. This is a prime example of this type of activity. Locations revealing this very particular type of experimentation with shotguns is very commonplace throughout the UK.

To date, (April 2024), I have found a total of 620 roadside firearm and shotgun experimental sites in the UK and Northern Ireland. I have also founds scores of sites whilst studying gun murder cases in France and the United States.

My first book, Gunfire Graffiti – Overlooked Gun Crime in the UK was published by Waterside Press in 2012, written under the pseudonym, Matt Seiber. The preface was written by the journalist Nick Ross the original presenter for BBC ‘Crimewatch’. This publication was supported by ballistic research carried out in Oxfordshire by Cranfield University. The book reveals some startling facts and a disturbing shortfall in the understanding of gun crime in the UK.

With regard to Bullet Path, an example of my research is the still unsolved Annecy Murders that took place in France on 05 September 2012. This tragic event continues to attract wild speculation and conspiracy theories. I have visited the location and the wider vicinity three times since 2015.

I completed an in depth interview in 2020 with the first witness at the scene. This was Brett Martin from the UK. I was involved in the Channel 4 documentary, ‘Murder in the Alps’, which was featured in three parts in June 2022, and I have met Zaid al-Hilli the brother of murdered Saad al-Hilli.

My latest book, Sabre Prattling – The Language of the Battlefield was published by Beachy Books in September 2022. It describes and explains the origins of the armament and conflict metaphors we all use in day to day conversation. It covers the subject – Lock, Stock and Barrel.